As the Valley’s premier leadership organization, Valley Leadership boasts a proven and long-standing track record of making deep impacts on the community.

Our roots date back to the late 1970s when a group of Valley visionaries recognized the need to identify and develop the next generation of leadership. Our founders imagined an annual succession of educated change agents dedicated to the best possible future for our region.

Almost 40 years later, their vision has produced nearly 3,000 alumni from our multi-generational programming. Through high-quality education, unprecedented access and an innovative network, Valley Leadership goes beyond traditional leadership programs by empowering youth, high-potential and proven leaders to advance their passions and accelerate their pursuits.

Our legacy of impact includes:
vl_infographics_b

Stories from our Alumni

Here’s Valley Leadership Institute Class 36’s impact:

The group projects required of each Valley Leadership Institute class are just one example of the ways that VL participants and alumni make significant and lasting impact on local communities. Following VL tradition, group projects are judged and scored by a panel of alumni and key community partners, based on criteria such as understanding an issue of regional importance; creating and completing a usable project; practicing and modeling civil discourse skills throughout; connecting with both classmates and community leaders; and making a positive impact on the community.

The winning project for Class 36 organized the efforts of a local editor and artist to create a book for early childhood readers. The book, “Who knew it grew from Poo?” teaches young readers about the science of aquaponics, a system of aquaculture in which the waste produced by farmed fish or other aquatic animals supplies nutrients for plants grown hydroponically, which in turn purify the water. The approach uses 90 percent less water (ideal for desert living) and can produce up to 3 times more produce at a faster rate than traditional urban gardening. The judges selected this project for several reasons, including: it starts with education, it has broad outreach, and it inspired people to action.

Other Class 36 group projects included:

Arizona 2030 – Launched Arizona 2030, a collaborative platform that connects businesses, community organizations, and individuals committed to solving Arizona’s biggest challenges, to advance ideas and solutions dedicated to creating a better future for all Arizona citizens by the year 2030. Listen to this interview of group leader, Andre C. St. Pierre:


Daring Adventures – This group of leaders executed a comprehensive “AZ Gives Day” campaign that raised $70,000, which is being invested into the nonprofit agency’s infrastructure to support its sustainability goals.

Grant Network – Launched the Grant Network, a new and improved on-line grants and knowledge platform that serves as Arizona’s premier resource for the nonprofit sector to locate funding, identify partnerships and connect with sponsors.

hART Gallery – Installed youth art in public spaces around the Valley, providing exposure for important youth art programs, and beautiful locally sourced art that is available for purchase to benefit the partnering nonprofits agencies.

Sojourner Center – Leveraged connections to provide an update to the donor center for the organization including, new children’s play area, administrative office spaces, and donor collection area. In addition approximately $2,000 was raised to help the nonprofit agency fund other improvements needed.

United Food Bank – Constructed the VL Pavilion at the United Food Bank, a shaded structure that welcomes visitors to the food bank and recognizes the nonprofit agency’s donors.

 

Legacy of Impact